The Swallowed Anchor

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Mark Lindholm is the not so proud owner of the house across from his Westbay Marine Village in Esquimalt. He plans to develop the area into a mixed commercial and residential development and the house came with the land. It also came with a pirate on the roof, a crow’s nest by the front door, a ship’s cannon, anchor, Neptune, a mermaid and a stork made by the house’s owner John Keziere.

Chesterfield House

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I’m all for carriage houses, granny flats, laneway homes and any other type of creative housing that’s under 750 square feet and keeps elderly parents close by, increases density where it makes sense, and provides more rental space. What I really hate is when developers bend the rules to create large footprints and unaffordable houses.

Fred Thornton Hollingsworth

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Fred Thornton Hollingsworth met Frank Lloyd Wright in 1951 and turned down a job to work with the legend. Instead the architect stayed in Canada and is responsible for the look of post war North Vancouver.

Chuck Davis

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I wrote about Jimmy Cunningham last week, the name behind the run around Stanley Park that happens every Halloween. I found out about him through a website created by Chuck Davis. Like the guy himself, it’s an amazing resource about our city.

James Cunningham and the Stanley Park Seawall

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If you’re planning to enter the James Cunningham Seawall Race this month, spare a thought for its namesake, Jimmy Cunningham. The little Scotsman spent 32 years of his life heaving granite blocks weighing hundreds of pounds and built over half of the 9.5 kilometre wall.

BC Binning and the Heritage Inventory

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Most municipalities have a heritage inventory that includes houses built before 1940. Makes sense doesn’t it? When you think heritage you think old. But actually heritage can be 20 years old, and that can surprise a new home owner wanting to renovate or demolish who is suddenly hauled in front of a heritage commission.

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