Category: Missing heritage

Our Missing Heritage–The Georgia Medical-Dental Building: what were we thinking?

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On May 28, 1989, we blew up the Georgia Medical-Dental Centre, a building on West Georgia designed by McCarter & Nairne, the same architects behind the Marine and the Devonshire Apartments. *

The Devonshire was first, designed as an apartment building in 1923. Next came the 15-storey art deco medical building—and the Marine Building was completed in 1930—the only one left standing.

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The Life and Death of Seaton Street

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Last week I wrote about the oldest house in Vancouver—well at least that’s what they called it when it burned to the ground in 1946. It was built in 1875, and until 1915, its address was Seaton Street.

Unlike most of Vancouver’s streets that are named after old white men, Lauchlan Hamilton, the CPR surveyor, named this one in 1886 after pulling it at random from a map (the town of Seaton is long gone, but used to be near Hazelton in northern BC).

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The Missing Houses of Yaletown

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Do you remember the little house on Richards Street between Nelson and Helmcken? It was one of the last ones standing and for years had quite the garden and lots of funky birdhouses and wheelbarrows. I was reminded of it when Glen Mofford posted a photo that he took of owner Percy Linden outside his house in the summer of 2001.

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Switzer House (1960-1971)

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This story ran in North Shore Living magazine last December. If you are not one of the 20,000 people who live in zillion dollar waterfront houses, you may not have received a copy with your North Shore News.

In 1960, the Taylor Way interchange on the Upper Levels Highway looked radically different than it does today.

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Imperial Roller Skating Rink and the other missing structures of Beach Avenue

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More than 100 years before the laughing statues appeared at English Bay, the Imperial Roller Skating Rink opened in Morton Park at Denman and Davie Streets. Roller skating was experiencing a surge in popularity and the rink was housed in a big wood framed building with a huge tower that looked out over Beach Avenue and boasted the “largest skating floor on the continent.”

In 1912 for instance, you could go skating at the Roller Rink and wander across the road, past the Englesea Lodge and out along the English Bay Pier.

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